Use pictures to create submissions that underwriters love

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According to Wikipedia, the phrase "A picture is worth a 1,000 words" refers to the idea that concepts can be conveyed with just a single image. So don't write 1000's of words. Use pictures to help tell your story.

Yes, words are extremely important and necessary, especially when you are creating a submission (even a small package one). Underwriters need detailed information about the nature of a risk, from the description of business operations, to the construction of the walls, to the neighbouring structures and tenants. 

But, brokers aren't really known for being verbose with the written word, especially when it comes to their submissions. And that's okay - you're not Shakespeare, and your underwriters are not looking for the next Pulitzer Prize. But they are looking for you to create a compelling story about the nature of a risk.

Instead, use these 5 pictures to help create submissions your underwriters will love.

1. Stock and equipment

Let's imagine you are preparing a submission for a new pizzeria that has opened up. Do they use gas ovens or a big wood burning oven? 

pizzeria_wood_oven 

2. Interior

What does the inside of the establishment look like? Are there any risks?

pizzeria_serving

3. Exterior

What does the outside of the establishment look like? Is there outdoor seating?

pizzeria_exterior

 

4. Neighbouring structures and tenants

Who is to the left and right of the insured? Is there anyone in front or behind? Are the buildings joined? Is there a water hazard?

pizzeria_venice

 

5. Multiple locations

If the insured has multiple locations, it is helpful to include pictures of each. This gives the underwriter an idea of the scope of their operations.

 

Of course, you can always submit a Request For Quote (RFQ) with no pictures. But this is boring, and doesn't help your underwriter understand the full nature of the risk. More importantly, the pictures you use in your submission can be easily put into your proposal back to the prospect.

So go ahead. Channel your inner Leibovitz or Adams or Capa. Your underwriters will love you for it.